Published: Sat, August 11, 2018
Sports | By Sarah Myers

Texas Basketball: How will the new NCAA rule changes impact the Longhorns?

Texas Basketball: How will the new NCAA rule changes impact the Longhorns?

The NCAA unveiled several rule changes Wednesday, in hopes of eradicating - or more realistically, reducing - the significant amount of corruption, which recently stained the sport and was exposed past year through an FBI investigation.

After an FBI investigation found in September that several Division I college basketball coaches were implicated in recruiting bribery, the NCAA wanted to change up some rules to safeguard themselves from ever having to clean up this mess again.

In the past, if a college basketball player declared for the draft, they had until 10 days after the draft combine to return to school.

The NCAA announced several new policies and rules today, including that players will now be allowed to return to school if they declare for the National Basketball Association draft but are not selected.

Agents would be allowed to cover minimal expenses such as meals and transportation associated with meetings or workouts with pro teams, but that could be complicated.

Pending a decision by the NBA and its players' union, high school players can be represented by an agent beginning July 1 before their senior year, if the player has been identified as an elite senior prospect by USA Basketball.

ESPN's Jonathan Givony was trying to get to the bottom of the rule changes, and he initially noted some confusion about what was going on.

I'm uneasy the NCAA wants to limit access to agents to those they define as "elite".

University presidents and chancellors will be held "personally accountable" for any rule-breaking by their athletic departments.

Last month in Las Vegas, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said, "My personal view is that we're ready to make that change, [but] that it won't come immediately".

That agreement must end if the player returns to school. The NCAA plans to pursue more rigorous certification requirements to ensure transparency in operations and finances. There will also be longer postseason bans, head coach suspensions and increased recruiting restrictions for college coaches who break the rules. NCAA cases now can draw upon information obtained through other entities, such as government agencies, which will speed up the process of investigating issues.

In addition, school presidents and athletics staff will be required to commit "contractually" to cooperate fully with investigations. The NCAA will also add public members to its Board of Governors. "We remain committed to promoting fairness in college sports and creating an environment that will champion the success of student-athletes".

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